FreshProse

...the Rewriter.ca Blog

What the FONT?

Posted on: February 27th, 2015 by Deborah Plouffe No Comments

Our expert this month is CHRIS STEINGART from QTWeb.ca

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There are lots of great reasons these days not to be stuck with standard web fonts.

Gone are the days of being limited to only a handful of fonts as we can now embrace some really great options for generating a myriad of web fonts on your website.

In the olden days (ie. a few years ago) web developers were limited to a handful of fonts as your website needed to use a font that was installed on the computer of one of your visitors. Choosing a unique font could look great on your computer but you ran the risk of visitors only seeing it a basic serif or sans-serif font. Many designers found ways around this by creating banners that featured text loaded as images, which was a great option for sites that weren’t assembled dynamically. The other issue was that ‘tricking’ users with images instead of text also tricked you out of having elements of your page recognized by search engines.

Thankfully today there are several great options for expanding your font horizons on your site:

@font-face
A simple CSS3 rule that allows you to host fonts on your server and have them rendered via your website if the visitor to your site doesn’t have the font installed on their computer. This method is supported on Safari, Chrome, Firefox and some acceptance in IE.
To use the @font-face property, simply upload an otf font file to your server and then enter the following code into your CSS specifying the location of the font family:

@font-face {
font-family: GraublauWeb;
src: url(“path-to-the-font-file/GraublauWeb.otf”) format(“opentype”);
}
One drawback to using this technique is that you need to be licensed to use a specific font and larger companies could face lawsuits for using these fonts. Beyond this and a few browser compatibility issues, @ font-face is an incredibly easy way to add fonts to your website.

Cufon
Cufon is a font replacement solution that allows you to upload a font to the Cufon Font Generator and create a javascript file that can be uploaded to your web server. In many ways this works very similar to @ font-face but it’s been regarded as a more complicated way to implement and you can’t use it for body text on your website, so in our opinion why would you want to use it? Nevertheless many people still do continue to use Cufon so we felt it important to keep it in this list. If you need a solution to style headers in specific fonts, this could be for you.

Typekit
Founded in 2008 and currently owned by Adobe, Typekit uses javascript to allow users to embed fonts. It supports the @font-face property and all fonts available are licensed. Typekit is a subscription-based service with rates running from $2-8 based on the number of fonts you would like access to and the # of page loads in a month.

Google Fonts API

The newest player in the web font scene, what started as a project featuring 20 fonts now offers over 450 font families and the best part it’s free! The system basically works the same as typekit with fonts hosted on google’s server, but without the cost. To use a font, all you have to do is find the font in google’s directory and copy the embed code to place in the <head> of your website. The Google Font API means that you don’t need to use CSS3’s @ font-face method (while you do in Typekit) allowing complete cross-browser compatibility. Google Fonts is the best solution for anybody wanting to get their feet wet in the world of web fonts, there’s a large library to choose from and it’s well documented.

The changing landscape
As you can see, there are plenty of great ways to implement new fonts into your website for the beginner and master coder alike. So the only thing left is to get started and dive into the pool and start playing around with web fonts!

*Special note, while the title of this article is a crude play on words, it also happens to be the name of one of our favourite free font identification apps.

CLICK HERE to visit the QTWeb BLOG!

Will the Silliest Sign Please Stand Out?

Posted on: February 24th, 2015 by Deborah Plouffe No Comments

This January, we launched the first of two planned FREE$tuff emails for the first quarter of 2015: SATURDAY SILLY SIGNS. This is a pictorial spin-off from our Gaffe du Jour and THIS time, the Gaffe will be in pictures. You’ll receive a new “Silly Sign” every Saturday night– mostly funny church signs (there are plenty of those!) with a few grammar gaffes and spelling blunders added in. Since we’re only sending one per week, we’ll be sure to send our very best!

We’ll also be publishing a 30-part series centred on “How to Write an eBook in 30 Days.” We’ve had this one on the back burner for far too long and we’re really looking forward to getting this informative program out to all of our subscribers. In fact, we’re offering a SUPER COOL bonus to the first ten subscribers. We’ll tell you ALL about that in the March issue!

The Long and the Short on Acronyms

Posted on: February 19th, 2015 by Deborah Plouffe No Comments

By definition, an acronym is an abbreviation that is formed by the first letters of the components in a word or phrase. Quite often, businesses and industries have acronyms associated with them and it is important to make sure that our writing allows for our readers to understand them fully.

Some acronyms are so common that they are treated ALMOST as their own word. Examples like CEO, AIDS, NATO, and EU come to mind and it would seem quite odd to write they out in full.

There are two ways to deal with these in your writing. In large publications like an instruction manual or eBook, you would add a glossary or a section explaining acronyms that are used. This is usually placed after the Table of Contents. Then, you’re free to use your acronyms without having to spell them out.

In shorter texts, however, we need to be more direct about how we define these. In most cases, you would write out the full text the first time that you use it, followed by the acronym in brackets, for example the European Union (EU). Afterward, you can use the EU for the duration of the document. In most cases, we would precede them with the word “the” as in the EU or the CBC. However, in a few cases, we drop “the” altogether whenever the acronyms are pronounced like words. For instance you would never write “the” NATO or “the” NASA the way that you would write the UN.

Keep in mind that acronyms are written without spaces and without periods in between the letters. Also, please remember that apostrophes are added only as signs of possession, as in “the CBC’s evening report.” When converting them to the plural PLEASE don’t use an apostrophe! Simply adding a lower case letter “s” as we see in ABCs will do the trick!

What’s New for February 2015?

Posted on: February 17th, 2015 by Deborah Plouffe No Comments

DEAL OF THE MONTH from REWRITER.CA

For each month of the Year 2015, we’re offering a different DEAL OF THE MONTH to EVERYONE!

This FEBRUARY 2015, we’re DOUBLING THE VALUE of our REFERRAL GIFT CARDS!

That means you’ll earn an Amazon.ca gift card equal to 20% of the value of your referral’s first job with rewriter.ca.
CLICK HERE to learn more!

We’ve also wrapped up the recording of the PAINLESS! video series, which is ready for sale on the NEWORLD COACHING website.

CLICK HERE to learn more about how this series can help ANYONE to overcome procrastination and EVERYONE to achieve ANYTHING!

Then, this coming March, we plan to release our E@SY eZINES product.

So check the WHAT’S NEW section of next month’s newsletter for more details!

Valentine Print Me PUZZLE

Posted on: February 12th, 2015 by Deborah Plouffe No Comments

CLICK HERE to access this month’s PRINT ME Puzzle!

Here’s our FEBRUARY Word Search puzzle!

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P.S. Check out our new PUZZLES page on rewriter.ca

Do You LOVE Your eZine?

Posted on: February 5th, 2015 by Deborah Plouffe No Comments
 

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“The Internet is the world’s largest library. It’s just that all the books are on the floor.”

                       – John Allen Paulos

    HOW YOUR YOUR E-NEWSLETTER WORKS FOR YOU!


Did YOU know that the number of Internet uses worldwide has surpassed TWO BILLION? It’s little wonder that many of us have come to realize that in order to survive in business we MUST have an online presence.

We’ve gone far beyond just having to maintain an effective website or blog, though. Regular email marketing is a vital strategy for business growth and this should include publishing a periodic online newsletter. Let’s look at just a few things that sending that email newsletter can do to help you to grow your business.

  • Enhance your brand image through consistency and awareness
  • Stay in the minds of your database
  • Reinforce relationships with clients and build new ones with prospects
  •  Build trust and credibility
  •  Generate referrals
  •  Interact with your readers
  • Reduce costs associated with paid advertising
  • Help others while you share your knowledge

Every business owner should be sending a regular email newsletter, both as a first rate marketing tool and a proven method for turning prospects into clients. If you are both consistent and persistent, the time and effort that you take to organize and produce a regular newsletter will prove to be worth it!

~ Deborah

P.S. Our E@sy eZines product, which will launch in March 2015, takes you through the process of designing, creating and marketing your online newsletter. So, watch for details in the next issue!

Try Our Language Quiz!

Posted on: February 3rd, 2015 by Deborah Plouffe No Comments

Do you know the answer to this month’s Trivia Quiz? Send an email with your guess, and we’ll reward the correct entries with a prize. Or, if you’re into suspense, we’ll publish the answer in the next issue of
Timed Write.

Now this is just SILLY! Can YOU name the longest word in the English language that does not contain ANY of the vowels A-E-I-O-U ? Email us with the answer and we’ll send you back a prize!

P.S. Here are the answers for our December Trivia Quiz

1.    “One-horse Open Sleigh”
2.    1857
3.    “Lean and lank”
4.    You take the lead
5.    A one-horse open sleigh, of course!

Two New FREE$tuff Programs on the Drawing Board

Posted on: January 29th, 2015 by Deborah Plouffe No Comments

We’ll be introducing TWO new FREE$tuff emails over the next few months. The first is a pictorial spin-off from our Gaffe du Jour. This time, the Gaffe will be in pictures and you’ll receive a new “Silly Sign” every Saturday night. The idea is to show mostly funny church signs (there are plenty of those!) with a few grammar gaffes and spelling blunders. Since we’re only sending one per week, we’ll be sure to send our very best!

We’ll also be publishing a 30-part series centred on “How to Write an eBook in 30 Days.” We’ve had this one on the back burner for far too long and we’re really looking forward to getting this informative program out to all of our subscribers. In fact, we’re offering a SUPER COOL bonus to the first ten subscribers. We’ll tell you ALL about that in the February issue!

Rewriter.ca Recommends This Free Program!

Posted on: January 27th, 2015 by Deborah Plouffe No Comments

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Thanks for sharing your words of time management wisdom, Michael Fletcher! If you missed his guest blog post, you can FIND IT HERE!

Here’s a great offering from the NEWORLD COACHING website. CLICK ON THE GRAPHIC above to learn more about this and other “no-cost” programs and downloads!

Grab our January PUZZLE and Let It Snow!

Posted on: January 22nd, 2015 by Deborah Plouffe No Comments

CLICK HERE to access this month’s PRINT ME Puzzle!

         Here’s our JANUARY Word Search puzzle!